Basta um Dia / Living Day by Day:
Comments


Viewer Comments about Basta um Dia / Living Day by Day


Vagner,

I loved the film, although the topic was so difficult it left me quite depressed.  The interviews were incredibly touching and their reality really hit home.  The film was moving in its humanity and sensitivity.  Wonderful job!
Keep up the good work......the world needs to hear those stories and you do them justice!
Beijos y mas,
Mayra Pabon

Department of Sociomedical Scienses
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Heath, New York
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Dear Vagner,

I feel compelled to send you a brief note on your latest film, Basta Um Dia.  Your documentary of the lives of the young, transvestite, and gay community in the Fluminense Valley provided a moving and "eye-opening" account of their very harsh lives.  I was moved and saddened by the day-to-day uncertainties that characterize their lives.  Your documentation of the violence that these young people face everyday is profound, and it is extremely disturbing to learn about their dire circumstances.  It is unconscionable that they are violated not only by the people who perpetuate the vicious and hateful crimes against them, but by the police and other authorities who turn a blind eye to their basic human need for safety, and even by the undignified manner in which they are treated in death.  Anyone who is interested in social justice and basic human rights would be very interested in seeing this film.  I hope the net result will be the mobilization of a strong social movement to protest the violence and to protect the basic human rights of transvestite and gay community in the Fluminense Valley. 
best,
Ana F Abraido-Lanza
Associate Professor
Department of Sociomedical Scienses

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Heath, New York
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Dear Vagner,

I just wanted to let you know how much I got from your film yesterday. At some point I’d like to talk with you about the dead body in Brazilian culture. Maybe it was just the bodies of the slain transvestites that were treated differently, but I was so struck by the presence of the dead bodies in the media. American media shelters us so from the dead body (as does our culture in general) that it was very surprising to me to see the extent to which people in Brazil seem to have access to images of the dead—and not in a pristine form, but in their violated stated. Thank you for sharing your work with all of us. Fondly,
Amy Fairchild, PHD,MPH
Associate Professor
Center for History & Ethics of Public Health
Department of Sociomedical Scienses
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Heath, New York
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I've been talking a lot about your movie already and it's barely been 12 hours since I saw it! I look forward to staying in touch with you about your work and LGBT human rights issues in Brazil. Also please let me know whenever you are screening the film as I would love to get our membership out to see it...

Basta Um Dia is a profound and haunting exposure of the insidious violence experienced by the young transgender women and gay boy sex workers who exist at the nexus of so many systems of inequality and oppression: race, class, gender, sex, health, family, religion, geography, and education. Looking behind the veil of fear and privilege, Vagner de Almeida exits the superhighway of indifference and trains his lens on The Massacre and its victims (both dead and alive) as they struggle to live another day.


Peace,
Diana Sands
LGBT Human Rights Associate

 

 



for more information email: vagner.de.almeida@gmail.com